Everybody's Got One
A blog. An opinion. An elimination orifice. A dream. An agenda. A past. A hidden talent. A conceptual filter. A cross. A charism (often the same). A task. A wound. A destiny. A lost love. A blind spot. A bad habit. A secret. A passion. A soul ... okay, maybe not everybody ...
Saturday, April 10, 2004

 

From Mark Brittingham, back after an extended hiatus:
I will argue that the Cold War is not over, that the U.S. has not won the 'war' and that the battles that lie ahead will be far more difficult to pin down than even the asymmetric warfare of the Islamic terrorists. These battles will not be fought with guns and missiles but will take place in the sphere of ideology. ... [W]hile the U.S. has won a protracted battle against one manifestation of a larger philosophical challenge to American political ideals (the 'Cold War' against the Soviet Union), it is losing the broader battle taking place in the hearts and minds of people the world over.
One of the curious things about the European notion that nationalism is the root cause of war is that the destructive wars have been multi-national ones; bi-national wars stay fairly contained. The long struggles come when two alliances or great powers make common cause against a third mutual foe. (The WWII European theater with Soviets and the Anglosphere against Germany is the paradigm here.) The real question for the next decades is whether the long war is going to be America and Europe against radical Islam, or radical Islam and the Left against the free-market West.

Wild Monk suggests that Europe and America were always natural rivals, temporarily united against a common foe; that the fall of the Berlin Wall had the same effect on NATO that Operation Barbarossa had on the Ribbentrop-Molotov pact, dissolving a temporary alliance of convenience.

It's going to be difficult to fight a continuing ideological Cold War at the same time a Hot - albeit low-level, asymmetric - one is going on. Unfortunately, we may not have a choice.

posted by Kelly | 6:08 PM link
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